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I love the way Elise reports on the happenings around the world. She is honest, unbiased and explains the reasoning of what’s behind her thoughts. Keep them coming.

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The article makes lots of sense to Western ears of people who live in Western democracies. There is only one problem: The Palestinians are not part of any democracy and , despite Oslo, the PLO charter was never amended. There is no need to even speak about the Hamas charter. If you look at the contents of the school books used in the West Bank and in the UNWRA schools in Gaza, you will retract your suggestion that the teachers teaching there need to be retained. Even the UN agreed to a buffer zone at the Lebanese border (1701, Hezbollah north of the Litani). So why would anyone want Hamas back at Israel’s southern border?

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Perhaps Elise Labott might address this theory in some future Mid East analysis?

https://www.cosmopoliticsbyelise.com/p/cant-quit-wont-quit-gaza

What if the prospects for peace between Israel and her neighbors are just dead, gone, over, impossible? The idea that peace may be dead in the Mideast seems a reasonable theory worth exploring, but so far I've not seen anyone explore it.

As example, about half of all marriages in America end in divorce. Presumably these couples made some attempt to work things out, but simply weren't able to overcome the obstacles, and so the relationship is then over. It's just over.

It seems to me that the bottom line demands of both parties in this conflict are simply incompatible. The evidence provided by the last 75 years of never ending conflict, and consistently failed peace efforts, seems to make this claim credible.

There's not going to be a one state solution, nor a two state solution.

Even if there were a two state solution, it wouldn't involve full sovereignty for the Palestinian state, so the conflict would continue. And if it did involve full sovereignty for the Palestinian state, the most ruthless members of Palestinian society would take that state over (like happens in every other Arab country) and they would then go on to their next demand, an end to Israel. So the conflict would continue.

What if it's time to face reality? What if there is no end to this conflict?

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